National News and Politics
041 secs
Hsquared Magazine
"Barbara Jordan of Texas sat on the House Judiciary Committee as a freshman during the Watergate hearings" by the U.S. House of Representatives Photography Office, 1974. Source: Wikimedia

On May 17, 2017, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a Special Prosecutor for the Department of Justice in the investigation of Russia’s attempts to influence the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections.

In a press release issued by the Department of Justice’s Office of Public Affairs, Rosenstein wrote “What I have determined is that based upon the unique circumstances, the public interest requires me to place this investigation under the authority of a person who exercises a degree of independence from the normal chain of command.”

Mr. Mueller’s greatest prosecuting authority will be derived under U.S. Code § 515, which allows Mueller to conduct civil or criminal proceedings on behalf of the Department of Justice, including conducting grand jury proceedings.

The Department of Justice’s order directs Mr. Mueller to investigate “any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump”, and to investigate related matters “that arose or may arise directly from the investigation.”

Mr. Mueller has been vested with additional jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute federal crimes related to any interference in the Special Prosecutor’s Russian investigation, including perjury, obstruction of justice, intimidation of witnesses, and the destruction of evidence.

 

Art and Photography
04 mins
Hsquared Magazine
There is a generation of Americans who grew up viewing graffiti as art. For a while, this perspective of graffiti as a form of expression which held merit, could have gone either way.
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There is a generation of Americans who grew up viewing graffiti as art. For a while, this perspective of graffiti as a form of expression which held merit, could have gone either way.

Graffiti sprung from gang culture, at least according to the nightly news, and as the evening news was as close to the truth of a nation as we were going to get, there was a fear in many a household that graffiti was the gateway drug to the other stuff.

Lawmakers did their best to warn adult Americans of the ill-effects of “tags”, low-riding pants, spray paint, rap music, baseball caps worn backwards, and hoodies.

Newscasts were dedicated to explaining hidden meaning behind words scrawled on neglected bridges, subway cards and street corners.

Officers were transferred from vice units to newly formed “gang units”. Individuals began to specialize in “street linguistics”, and were thus on-call to decipher the code of graffiti for viewing audiences nationwide.

The Great Gang Scare of the 1980s was a thing.

This era (there have been several) of ‘societal fear of the black man’ attempted to sway a generation from the acceptance of this black culture. The effort almost succeeded.

Legislation was created to provide a content rating’s system for music, police policies were drafted to allow searches of individuals on suspicion, and mandatory minimums were not far behind.

But much like it must have been when Elvis…