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By eds. Published on Oct 11, 2017
06 mins
Hsquared Magazine
Not since Nixon lost Cronkite - and Middle America in the process - has a public figure issued such a potentially forceful rallying cry against the abuses of a sitting President.

Eminem’s freestyle video which played at the BET Hip Hop Awards on Thursday is trending on Twitter, YouTube and being passed through Facebook feeds like by like. Not since Nixon lost Cronkite – and Middle America in the process – has a public figure issued such a potentially forceful rallying cry against the abuses of a sitting President.

The setting for the “The Storm” is a garage in Detroit. Eminem, outfitted in a dark hoodie, encircled by men sitting atop early model cars with headlights lit, begins the video with the line, “This is the calm before the storm right here”.

The line is a reference to Trump’s appearance on October 5, 2017 with a group of military leaders and their wives, in which the President implied the gathering represented “the calm before the storm”. When pressed by reporters to clarify what “calm before the storm” meant, the President replied, “you’ll find out.”

Eminem references Hillary Clinton in the line, “Back and forth with his fam to his golf resorts and his mansions? Same s— that he tormented Hillary for and he slandered.”

His reference to Colin Kaepernick, “F— that! This is for Colin, ball up a fist, And keep that s— balled like Donald the b—-” received over 205,000 retweets and 400,000 likes on Twitter when Mr. Kaepernick tweeted “I appreciate you @Eminem.

 

Lyrics

Intro

This is the calm before the storm right here.

Wait, how was I gonna start this off? I forgot. …

Oh yeah.

Verse

That’s an…

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There is a generation of Americans who grew up viewing graffiti as art. For a while, this perspective of graffiti as a form of expression which held merit could have gone either way.

Graffiti sprung from gang culture, at least according to the nightly news, and as the evening news was as close to the truth of a nation as we were going to get, there was a fear in many a household that graffiti was the gateway drug to the other stuff.

Lawmakers did their best to warn adult Americans of the ill-effects of “tags”, low-riding pants, spray paint, rap music, baseball caps worn backwards, and hoodies.

Newscasts were dedicated to explaining hidden meaning behind words scrawled on neglected bridges, subway cars and street corners.

Officers were transferred from vice units to newly formed “gang units”. Individuals began to specialize in “street linguistics”, and were thus on-call to decipher the code of graffiti for viewing audiences nationwide.

The Great Gang Scare of the 1980s was a thing.

This era (there have been several) of ‘societal fear of the black man’ attempted to sway a generation from the acceptance of this black culture. The effort almost succeeded.

Legislation was created to provide a content rating system for music, police policies were drafted to allow searches of people based simply on suspicion, and mandatory minimums were not far behind.

But much like it must have been when Elvis…

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