Transcript:

in the book the real evil
4:23
person … she’s sort of like a machine. There’s a lot of machine imagery in the
4:26
book and in this film when Fletcher brings another component to the film
4:32
completely. She had sort of a sexually ambiguous sexual attraction to Nicholson,
4:36
so you really don’t know the direction, and way the film is going to
4:40
go. So I …her performance surprised me and was one of the pleasant surprises in the
4:44
film. It’s a good film. It’s a little bit of a disappointing film. I think it
4:47
wasn’t quite the overwhelming experience that I’d expected. I think one of the
4:50
problems was that Foreman didn’t just stay with the human element of these
4:54
people we meet – the people in the ward. We begin to care about them and their
4:57
problems, and that’s good – and Nicholson is good when he’s interacting with those
5:00
people, but when Foreman backs up and tries to make his big points about the
5:04
establishment, and authority, and sanity, and insanity I think at that point the
5:08
movie loses its touch a little bit. I think it also backs up in trying to
5:12
give Nicholson so many great things. It’s almost like United Artists can count on
5:16
another million dollars in gross every time Nicholson has a riot scene.
5:20
And there’s so many, and the film is packed so solid that I think that the essence
5:24
of Jack Nicholson is lost by overkill sometimes. All the same, the audience
5:28
did love it, as we mentioned at the film festival and love that for scenes like
5:32
this one: Nicholson has all the guys out playing basketball, including about a 30 year old
5:36
aging Indian Chief who hasn’t spoken in 12 years. He’s allegedly a deaf-mute,
5:41
and as we can see in this clip this the chief is not exactly a natural athlete.

END

Editor’s Note: Siskel’s & Ebert’s review of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest was generally positive, but the pair did express frustrated criticism with the direction of the film. Elsewhere in the clip, Roger Ebert mentions Nicholson as one of Ebert’s favorite American actors in film.

Editors, writers and members of the Fraternal Order of the Leather Apron Club.